San Bernardino Saltwater Live Bait Tanks

How Weather Patterns Can Affect Fishing On The Water

Fishing is a great way to spend per day. To become a great fisherman may seem like a difficult task, however, like many skills this simple requires some practice and basic knowledge. There are numerous great spots to go fishing through out the San Bernardino area, and in nearby mountains. In this short article, we provide several tips to be of assistance in becoming a better fisherman. The following article will show you the best way to increase your haul in such a way that you just never imagined.

Should you use shad and bottom fishing, cut the tail away from the shad before baiting your hook. This prevents the bait from tangling as a result of spin because it goes further in to the water. Moreover, the scent of your cut tail can help to attract fish on it.

Casting on the shore of any river or lake around San Bernardino can often net the greatest results. Fish who rely on insects for food generally discover them in abundance near to the shore, to have more bites by casting your lure during these areas. However, if you cast close to the shoreline, you must take care not to tangle your line in weeds or debris.

Choose an inverse color for your personal bait in the color of water. Many fisherman prefer to use live bait kept in a live bait carrier, because fresh bait will normally yield better quality fishing. If the water is murky, use light colored bait that it is visible on the fish. On the other hand, if the water is obvious, ensure that you use darker colored bait.

When fishing, sit in the location for at least half an hour before stopping. Oftentimes, you must supply the scent of your bait a chance to travel and you must provide the fish in the water time and energy to locate your line. In the event you don’t wait a minimum of half an hour with this to occur, you could possibly neglect some very nice catches.

Always pack extra supplies of food and water, especially on hot days. Sitting in the sun for several hours at the same time can drain your whole body, so it is essential that you continue it replenished to maintain your power levels. Bring snacks plus some meals, depending on how long you plan to keep out.

bucket fishing

Which means you made our minds up you would like to take up fishing like a hobby. If you are just starting with fishing, you should maintain your equipment pretty simple. It all depends on what you are actually form of fish you are fishing for with regards to equipment. Most beginners begin with lightweight tackle. The main beginner’s equipment will include a rod and reel, 12 lb. test line, small and medium sized hooks (for live bait fishing), several bobbers, a couple of artificial lures, some sinkers, a pair of pliers, a net, along with a pocket knife. Don’t forget to examine your state’s laws to discover should you need a fishing license for the body of water in which you anticipate fishing.

Make sure to use correct casting technique while you are fly fishing. You must have approximately 20 feet of line out before you if you cast. Stay away from jerky motions, and cast a straight line. Above all, try and relax which means that your tense muscles will not likely ruin your casting.

Make sure to match the size of your bait to the size of the fish you are trying to catch. The logic behind this really is simple — small fish pursue small bait, while larger fish will chase larger kinds of bait. Bluegill and Crappie make good bait for larger fish including Muskie and Pike.

Fishing is really a sport with universal appeal. Fishing is the best way to relax and enjoy yourself, in addition to relieving difficulties with anxiety or stress. Successful fishing is often a combination of techniques, patience and luck. If you are using the recommendation you possess read, you might be on the right track to becoming a skilled fisherman.

Fishing Rods Review

building a bait tank

I began fishing about 4 years ago as a way to relieve stress. I imagined fishing would be like meditating, an opportunity to clear my mind, commune with nature and just relax. Never in a million years did I imagine the dichotomy that exists when fishing . Fishing is so simple, yet so complex. I learned fishing is very relaxing, relieves stress, however, it’s not at all like mediating. When fishing you don’t clear your mind at all, the exact you actually open it, you open your mind to all possibilities. You plan your approach and you anticipate your catch! There are three things I learned through my fishing experiences that I have been able to translate and apply to my business: 1) Tools, 2) Patience, 3) Success.

  • Tools: You absolutely must have the right poles, wire, bait, and tackle. Attempting to fish with the wrong tools, can be unsafe and cause you to be unsuccessful. In order to have the right tools, you have to know where your fishing, what your fishing for and the behavior of that type of fish.
  • Patience: Understanding that fish don’t want to be caught, they are attracted to your bait. It may take a while for them to be attracted or they may be smart enough to nibble at your bait without getting hooked, but either way, while your waiting for something to bite…you have time on your hands to think of other things (formulate better plans), such as how to attract more fish, finding better fishing spots, determining the amount of fish needed to feed your family or my personal favorite…I need to get better at fishing and I wanna buy a boat!
  • Success: If you are able to take everything you have learned, apply it and have fun, then fishing can be one of the most rewarding and relaxing activities, EVER. If you have the opportunity to stare at the water, think, fight and win the battle of reeling in your own dinner it is even more of a success.

In life, no matter what you’re trying to “catch” or “hook”, it’s all about the bait. Think about what you’re trying to catch, research to find out what it likes, locations it frequents, and it’s habits. Then develop a plan to catch/hook it, but, be sure to use the most effective bait based on the behaviors you’ve learned as a result of your research.

For 18 plus years I’ve been teaching executives how to connect w/middle management, managers how to connect w/employees and employees how to connect w/customers. To be successful at connecting or catching/hooking people, you must use bait that IS or APPEARS to be a reward worth pursuing, the bait must have a benefit.

In consulting, we use story telling and experiences (as bait) to communicate and market our expertise. We appeal to clients by showing them we have fished in the same pond and been successful. We guide them with our experiences, make suggestions regarding best fishing practices, and show them how to successfully catch fish.

What bait are you using to hook and reel in your dream job, client, spouse or experience?

Do you have a good understanding of your target audience? Do you know what motivates them? Is your bait irresistible enough to encourage your target audience to learn more about your product/service?

If you aren’t getting the results you desire…..check your bait!!

Are You Using The Right Bait?
I began fishing about 4 years ago as a way to relieve stress. I imagined fishing would be like meditating


San Bernardino Live Bait Systems

Fishing can be a phenomenal and fun activity for children and youngsters. Fishing can be a very fulfilling sport; you and your family can fish rather than dealing with the hectic routines of day to day life in San Bernardino, and enjoy the outdoors. Families regularly enjoy the outside air, find out about the earth, and even create great memories. Best of all, fishing is quality time spent together talking, laughing and sitting next to each other. It can be a perfect game for little children, on the off chance that you present it emphatically. For some families, the experience of fishing with live bait, and catching fish that later become dinner, can be a memory making experience that lasts a lifetime.

Here are some of the thought to make your fishing trip successful in San Bernardino with your kids.

live bait containers

San Bernardino Live Bait Well

bait caster reels

How to Build a Deck in a Bass Boat

DIY Nuc Plans

Beekeeping is a very rewarding hobby, just think about all that delicious, golden honey flowing, mmm! Those of us that have been keeping bees for any time knows that you eventually need to start splitting your hives to prevent them from swarming. Another advantage of splitting is to make a new hive for another beginner to start their own apiary. Perhaps you are an adventurous type and are interested in rearing your own queens.

What ever your motivation is for slitting your hives, you will need the proper equipment to do so. One of the most important pieces of equipment you will need is the box, and that is where your nucs come in very handy. A nuc is a smaller bee box that makes it easier for a fledgling colony of bees to get a strong start. The problem is that they aren't exactly cheap, especially if you are buying several at a time.

This lens is dedicated to teaching you how to make your own nucs!

Step 1: Cutting Your Wood

Making the puzzle pieces

The first step is the most time consuming, especially if you have never done this before. Once you have made a nuc or two, it starts to become a breeze. If you study the picture carefully, it has every piece laid out on a 2' x 4' piece of plywood. Personally, I use 3/4 inch plywood from Lowe's or Home Depot. I tried 1/2 but it didn't seem to hold up on the joints nearly as well. Spend a few extra dollars for the good stuff, your bees will thank you.

Let me list out the dimensions of the pieces, just in case you can't quite read them in the picture. The parts are from left to right:

2 Front Walls - 7 1/2 x 9 1/2 (you will actually get three from the cut outs)

2 Front Tops - 9 x 2 1/2 (these become the handles of the box)

2 Side Walls - 10 1/2 x 19 3/4

1 Top - 9 x 22 3/4

1 Bottom - 9 x 24 (can be shorter if you like smaller landing areas for your bees)

Once you have cut the pieces you are ready to start your assembly. Yes, that's it, no more cutting or routing or anything else!

How to start beekeeping

Here are several books that will teach you everything you need to know about beekeeping, but don't forget, join a local beekeepers guild!

Step 2: Adding Sides

It starts looking like a box

There are several styles of putting the box together, but it really comes down to nails or screws. Nails are a bit easier to use, but the screws will last much longer. Personally, I've chosen to put a bit more effort into it and use the screws.

One word of caution if you do choose to use screws. Due to the fact that you are driving them into the end and side of a laminated piece of wood, it is strongly advised to drill a pilot hole before you actually drive your screws. This will keep the wood from cracking. It is also advisable to drive the screws or nails as straight as you possibly can so you won't have sharp objects poking out ready to impale you. Oddly enough, this tip is more for you than your bees. You will never hear your bees mumbling about the hive about pointy objects that they stubbed their toes on, but you will certainly hear about the beekeeper that ripped his jacket and let a good number of bees sneak in and sting him!

This step would be a tad easier if you had a third arm (as many tasks would) but it really isn't that bad. All you need to do at this point is to attach the sides to the OUTSIDE edges of the front and back. It is important to attach it to the outside or your nuc won't be wide enough to accommodate the five frames you need. I usually use two screws at each joint, you may want to add a third but watch out that you don't apply too much pressure and split the wood.

Step 3: Adding Handles

The handles double as the frame ledge too!

The part I love most about this design is that the handles actually double as the ledge that the frames rest on. Many other designs require that you use routers or other fancy techniques, but this is much easier.

Take the smallest pieces of the cutout and place it on the front flush with the top of the sides. It will overlap slightly with the front panel and the be flush with the outside of the side walls. Screw it in place with one screw on each side. Again, you may want to add an extra screw to give you a warm and fuzzy feeling, but one usually does the trick.

Flip the box over and repeat for the back handle and ledge.

Step 4: Attaching the bottom board

Even bees need a floor

Technically speaking, this step is optional. Sometimes you want to make a second story to a nuc that you already have going. In that case you wouldn't need a bottom board at all. It will simply set on top of the current nuc just like a normal size hive has many boxes stacked on top of each other.

If you do choose to add the bottom, flip the box over and lay the bottom board on it. You need to decide which end will be the front. The extra length of the bottom board will hang over on the front end. This will eventually become the landing pad for your bees. Once again, screw this onto the box, usually one screw on the end and two on each side.

I used to screw on the front until I started ruining my drill bits in the next step. You see, if you put the screw through the center of the front then when you drill the entrance hole you will drill right through your screw. Not a pretty site seeing your bits all chewed up. With a bit of experimentation, I discovered that it doesn't really help much to even have a screw on the front.

Step 5: Drilling holes

The bees need a door right?

The size and location of your entrance does actually matter. First, if you ask 5 different beekeepers what the right size of entrance holes is you will probably get 6 answers. I make my entrances 3/8 of an inch for three reasons: 1) it gives them plenty of room to come and go, 2) it is small enough to defend against pests and robber bees, and 3) most rodents have trouble getting through that size of a hole when seeking shelter.

As far as the location of the front entrance, be very careful when deciding where you place it! I have heard of people leaving up to an inch between the bottom board and the hole. This plan has a solid bottom board which does not give anywhere for water drainage. If you aren't careful, you could end up with an inch of bee soup in the bottom of your hive instead of honey.

I put my front entrance as close to the bottom board as possible. This allows for adequate drainage. The rear entrance is typically an inch or so under the rear handle. I leave this room just in case I need to move the box and a handful of bees have decided to hang out on the back porch. It is important that you do drill both openings, it will provide much better ventilation for the hive.

Step 6: Making the lid

The last step!

The lid is the easiest part of the entire job. Simply take the last remaining piece and screw two pieces of scrap, that you have from the cutting step, to the ends of the top piece and **poof** you have a lid. The only mistake that I have ever made in this step was not doing a test fitting before I screwed the scraps on. It is a good idea just as a sanity check to make sure that the lid will actually fit on top before you screw them down.

Bonus Step: Adding Bees!

Here comes the fun!

While it is rewarding to be able to make your own nuc boxes, it is fairly boring to watch an empty box. Go out and find a swarm or get in touch with your local beekeeping guild so you will have some little critters that call your box a home. They will love your newest creation, I promise!

What makes good nuc boxes?

When you are looking at buying or building a nuc box you should consider a few things. The box should fit snugly with the lid. The last thing you want is to have a gust of wind blow the roof off of your honey bees' house. The lid should also fit flush with the rest of the hive. If there is any bowing of the lid it can lend itself to not keeping crucial heat in during winter months. The entrance should not be too large. It doesn't take much of a space for the workers to come and go, so keep it small so rodents can't get in. It also makes it easier for the bees to protect their hive.

DIY Nuc Box

Why build your own?

The answer is quite simple, it is much cheaper. The nucs that I used to buy, not counting shipping, was about $25. The ones that I make now are $3.50. Holy savings batman!

Beekeeping can become a very expensive hobby. Many people say that there is no money in keeping bees but that isn't really true. The people that shell out tons of cash are the ones that buy overpriced equipment. If you are frugal with this hobby, it will definitely pay for itself many times over.

Nuc Box as a Bait Hive

Catching wild swarms of bees

If you are looking to expand the number of bee hives that you have, a nuc box is one of the best tools you can use. Select a wooded area that is fairly easy to get access to to place your swarm box. Put a piece of old comb in the box with a few frames and strap the box about 10 feet off the ground in a tree. A swarm is more likely to pick this box than other places because it smells like an old hive was there because of the comb and because it is up off the ground.

This method can bring you a few extra hives a year if done correctly. Hey, who doesn't like free bees!

I'd love to hear from you and your experiences making your nucs. Do you have any other plans that you have had luck with? Let me know and I will feature it for you!

San Bernardino

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San Bernardino Saltwater Live Bait Tanks